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Modern Day Prediabetes by Donna Douglass

These days, it’s not unusual to hear people say their doctor told them they are pre-diabetic. What’s interesting is that this illness is something that we rarely ever heard of even 10 years ago. So what exactly is prediabetes? According to the American Diabetes Association, prediabetes “is when a person’s blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not enough to be type 2 diabetes.” They also say that you have a greater chance of developing type 2 diabetes and other illnesses that are associated with it, like cardiovascular issues.

Some of the symptoms for prediabetes include:

• Unusual thirst

• Frequent urination

• Blurred vision

• Frequent infections

• Cuts and bruises that are slow to heal

• Tingling or numbness in the hands or feet

• Recurring skin, gum and bladder infections

Who should get tested?

Overweight people, especially those over 45, should get tested. It’s also a good idea to get tested if you have a family history of diabetes, a history of gestational diabetes or if you gave birth to a baby over nine pounds.

Some recommended tests are:

• Fasting plasma glucose test (FPG)

• Oral glucose tolerance test (og.tt)

• A1C Test-detects diabetes

Research shows that someone weighing 200 pounds can lower their risk for type 2 diabetes by 58 percent by losing 7 percent of their body weight (about 14 pounds) and exercising moderately, such as taking a brisk walking for 30 minutes a day five days a week.

In addition, clearing one’s plate of processed foods, sugar, white flours, chemicals and preservatives and replacing it with a clean, whole foods diet will help tremendously.  

By implementing a healthy lifestyle that includes a healthy diet and regular exercise, it’s possible to completely reverse pre-diabetes.

Quinoa 3 Ways

Here are some easy and delicious quinoa recipes. Be sure to buy quinoa that is pre-soaked or you will have to pre-soak it yourself prior to cooking so that it will not taste bitter.

Basic Quinoa Recipe

4 servings

1 cup quinoa

2 cups water

In a medium saucepan add quinoa and water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and cover to simmer for 15 minutes.

Quinoa Stuffed Peppers

2 servings

1 cup cooked quinoa

1 tsp olive oil

1 tsp fresh lemon juice

olive oil spray

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 cup broccoli florets, chopped

½ yellow pepper, diced

½ red pepper, diced

½ cup of snow peas, sliced

1 red pepper, cut in half

½ cup water or chicken stock

Thin strips of fresh basil

Preheat oven to 350 F. In a medium bowl, add cooked quinoa, olive oil and lemon juice and mix together and set aside. In a medium sauté pan sprayed with olive oil, add garlic, broccoli, peppers and snow peas and cook until just wilted. In a baking dish, place red pepper halves and stuff with quinoa mixture, top with thin strips of basil and add chicken stock or water. Cover with aluminum foil and bake for 30 minutes or until tender.

Quinoa with Apples, Blueberries, and Walnuts

2 servings

1 cup cooked quinoa

¼ cup unsweetened almond milk

½ apple, chopped

¼ cup fresh blueberries

1 Tbsp chopped walnuts

1 Tbsp ground flaxseed drizzle of maple syrup

dusting of cinnamon

Mix all ingredients together and serve hot or cold.

Quinoa with Vegetables

2 servings

1 cup cooked quinoa

1 tsp olive oil

1 tsp fresh lemon juice

olive oil spray

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 cup broccoli florets, chopped

½ yellow pepper, diced

½ red pepper, diced

½ cup snow peas, sliced

thin strips of fresh basil

In a medium bowl, add cooked quinoa, olive oil, and lemon juice and mix together and set aside. In a medium sauté pan sprayed with olive oil, add garlic, broccoli, peppers and snow peas and cook until just wilted. Top with basil. Add to quinoa. Can be served hot or cold.

Donna Douglass, is a natural foods chef, certified health coach and owner of What’s Cooking, a culinary and wellness education company, helps busy people and those who need special diets. She offers various health coaching services that include meal preparation and cooking and nutrition education. For more information, visit WhatsCookingForYou. com or call 548–6520.

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